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Workshops & Projects

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Met.a.phorum: a performative public dialogue on migration in two acts

2022, Prague Czech Republic

Recognizing the stereotypes that widen divisions and perpetuate the narrative of us versus them, we are asking non-performer/non-artist foreign-born people who live in the Czech Republic, and Czech-born people, to be part of a project that narrows that gap. Met.a.phorum is a nine-month project consisting of two phases (‘Acts’): a public dialogue and a staged performance event.

Supported with funding from 

What Country, Friends, Is This? 

2021, Prague Czech Republic

Forum theatre workshop and performance on housing discrimination against migrants in partnership with InBaze, z.s. This event exposed power dynamics, sparked dialogue about the issue, created solidarity, and involved audience and actors in collective problem-solving. 

Supported with funding from 

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Patriarcheaology

2021, Istanbul Turkey

Expressive arts & theatre workshop in partnership with SAYE Kolektif. The project took place over four days in Istanbul, Turkey. We used a mix of expressive forms – body awareness, theatre of the oppressed, painting, writing, and voice – to excavate the patriarchical voices that inhabit us and inhibit us, and to change our relationship to them. This project was piloted in 2021 and will run again in 2022.

Who Cares? 

2020, Prague Czech Republic

Forum theatre workshop and performance on LGBTQ rights as part of the Prague Pride festival. This interactive event raised questions and sparked dialogue about the pitfalls of registered partnership, the effects of structural homophobia, and how the system fails LGBTQ+ families. In so doing we added pressure to pass the same-sex marriage legislation with greater urgency.

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Stand Up!

2019, Prague Czech Republic

Forum theatre workshop on gender-based violence. This 3-day intensive examined the question so often asked of those who stay in situations of violence – “why don’t they just leave?” Through a process of image theatre and forum theatre, participants devised three short scenes that opened an honest dialogue about the issues, and created a new sense of solidarity.